Life under quarantine in Citta Della Pieve

Day 14, March 23, 2020

ALL WORK STOPPED ON BUILDING PROJECT (along with all sorts of other businesses, read on….) WILL CHECK BACK IN TOMORROW.

UPDATED: What are Italy’s tightened coronavirus quarantine rules?

SOURCE: AFP/The Local

news@thelocal.it
@thelocalitaly

10 March 2020
07:44 CET+01:00

Updated
23 March 2020
13:44 CET+01:00

coronavirushealthtravel

Here’s the latest on Italy’s countrywide restrictions, which have been tightened in order to fight the seemingly relentless spread of the new coronavirus.

Italians have been told to stay indoors and avoid all non-essential travel.

The lockdown and schools closures were initially set to be in place until April 3 but the government has suggested they will likely be extended.

Here are the main things to be aware of, according to the latest emergency government decree:

Don’t travel (unless it’s urgent) or go outside (unless it’s essential)

From the morning of Tuesday March 10, the movements of Italy’s population of 60 million have been limited and those rules have since been tightened.

Travel is only allowed for “urgent, verifiable work situations and emergencies or health reasons”.

On March 22 the government cracked down on travel between towns. Whereas it was initially possible to travel between neighbouring towns for the motive of buying supplies or returning home, this is now forbidden. 

The instruction expressly forbids Italians “from moving by public or private means of transport outside the municipality in which they are currently located”.

This theoretically means that Italians cannot travel to their second homes at the weekend or visit out-of-town relatives.

There is an exception for people who can prove they must travel “for work needs of absolute urgency or for health reasons”.

People who have tested positive for COVID-19 must not leave their homes for any reason, while anyone with a fever or respiratory symptoms are strongly encouraged to stay at home and limit social contact, including with their doctor.

To avoid work-related travel, public and private companies have been urged to put their staff on leave.

People have been asked to stay indoors unless they need to go to work or to buy essential food and supplies.

Anyone who needs to go out is required to fill out a standardised form justifying their reasons for doing so, carrying it with them at all times.

UPDATED: The form you need to go outside in Italy under new coronavirus rules

Authorities are relying on citizens to “self certify”, though people may need to show evidence of their need to travel – for example, proof that you have a medical appointment – and anyone found to have made a false claim can face criminal charges.

Trains, buses, trams and other public transit is running with reduced service, and airports remain open. Travel is possible if you can state your reasons for doing so. If you need to travel, check with your airline or travel company before leaving.

When can you go outside?

You are allowed to go outside for one of the following reasons:

  • An urgent, demonstrable work-related reason.
  • Health reasons, for example a doctor’s appointment.
  • “Situations of need”, for example to buy food, exercise or walk your dog.
  • Returning home.

This means that you can travel to work if your employer hasn’t enforced leave or put remote working in place, and you can go to a medical appointment if it has not been cancelled by the health facility.

You’re also allowed to travel in order to return home, meaning the area you are resident in. 

Tourists and anyone visiting from overseas are allowed to return home.

Are shops still open?

On March 21 the Italian government ordered all ‘non-essential’ businesses to close as part of the fight to contain Italy’s coronavirus crisis.

Italy’s latest step in its coronavirus lockdown is to “close down all productive activity throughout the territory that is not strictly necessary, crucial, indispensable, to guarantee us essential goods and services,” Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte announced on Saturday night. 

His government on Sunday evening issued a break-down of the businesses that will be allowed to continue operating (available here).

Any services not on the list have until March 25 to wrap up outstanding orders and close their doors until at least April 3. However, “non-essential” businesses can continue to operate if all their staff work entirely from home.

The government has designated around 80 sectors “essential”, notably: food, pharmaceuticals, transport, accommodation and media.

All businesses still open are expected to protect the safety of their staff and customers by taking precautions such as distributing gloves and face masks and ensuring people keep at least a metre’s distance between each other. 

READ ALSO: These are the businesses that can stay open under Italy’s latest quarantine rules

Gatherings cancelled

A decree prohibits “all forms of gatherings in public places or sites open to the public”.

Sporting events of all levels and disciplines are cancelled, stopping play in the top-flight Serie A football league.

High-level professional training for top national sports events and competitions organised by international bodies, such as the Olympic Games, may go ahead without spectators. All athletes, coaches and managers will undergo health checks.

Swimming pools, spas, sports halls and wellness centres must not operate, and ski resorts across the country are shut.

Venues shuttered 

Bars, restaurants and cafes are now closed, along with all museums and cultural venues, nightclubs, cinemas, theatres and casinos.

While supermarkets will remain open, large shopping centres and department stores must close on public holidays and the day before public holidays.

School’s out 

Schools and universities were already closed and that closure has now been extended until April 3rd. All exams are cancelled.

Many schools have implemented remote lessons with teachers giving classes and checking work online.

Religious institutions can stay open, as long as people stay a metre from one another – but ceremonies such as masses, marriages, baptisms and funerals are banned.

No big family meals

Travelling to your parents’ town or village for a meal is not considered “essential” and therefore will not be deemed a good enough reason to move around.

However, divorced parents can continue to move in order to see their children.

Looking after elderly relatives is not banned, but authorities stress that contact with elderly people is to be avoided in order to prevent spreading the infection to those most at risk.

Shopping is limited

Supermarkets , food shops and pharmacies are still open, but other shops such as hairdressers and clothes shops have been ordered to close.

Following some panic buying after the first nationwide measures came into force, the government has insisted there are no shortages of essential supplies. 

The production and transport of food and other essentials continues despite the lockdown.

Some regions stricter than others

The rules above are the minimum restrictions ordered by the national government: regional governments and local mayors have the authority to put in place stricter rules within their territory, and many have done so. 

In worst-hit Lombardy, for instance, as of March 23 people are no longer allowed to exercise outdoors and must limit dog walks to within 200 metres of their house.

Check the website of your local comune or region for the latest quarantine rules that apply where you are.

Here are the businesses that can stay open under Italy’s latest quarantine rules

The Localnews@thelocal.it
@thelocalitaly23 March 2020
09:07 CET+01:00coronavirusquarantinebusinessshops

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Here are the businesses that can stay open under Italy's latest quarantine rules

Shoppers in Genoa buy groceries amid Italy’s coronavirus lockdown. Photo: Miguel Medina/AFPThe Italian government has ordered all ‘non-essential’ businesses to close as part of the fight to contain Italy’s coronavirus crisis. So which ‘essential’ services are still running? (Paywall Free)

Italy’s latest step in its coronavirus lockdown is to “close down all productive activity throughout the territory that is not strictly necessary, crucial, indispensable, to guarantee us essential goods and services,” Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte announced on Saturday night. 

He didn’t spell out at the time which companies were considered “indispensable”, but his government on Sunday evening issued a break-down of the businesses that will be allowed to continue operating (available here).

Any services not on the list have until March 25 to wrap up outstanding orders and close their doors until at least April 3. However, “non-essential” businesses can continue to operate if all their staff work entirely from home.

The government has designated around 80 sectors “essential”, notably:

Food

Supermarkets, grocers, corner shops and all other stores selling food will remain open, with no nationwide restrictions on opening days or hours (though some regional authorities may limit opening hours locally).

Farming, fishing, and production of food and drink will also continue.

Pharmaceuticals

Pharmacies and parapharmacies (shops selling non-prescription health products such as first-aid kits, vitamins, sanitary towels, contact lens solution, etc) are still open, with no limits on opening hours.

The production of pharmaceuticals and medical equipment continues.


Workers sew face masks at a textile factory in northern Italy. Photo: Miguel Medina/AFP

Transport

Passenger and cargo transport by land, sea and air is still running – though as of March 23, people are no longer allowed to take public or private transport from one comune (city, town or village) to another except for urgent work or medical reasons. Previously people were allowed a little more flexibility to buy supplies or return home.

You can continue to take your own vehicle to a garage for repairs, or buy parts to fix it.

Accommodation 

There are no nationwide closures of hotels and other accommodation, though the region of Lombardy has ordered those within its territory to close.

Newspapers

Publishers can continue making and distributing newspapers and magazines, while newsagents and news kiosks can continue to sell them.

Newsagents can also continue to sell tobacco products, though lottery tickets and all other gambling is halted.


Buying a newspaper in Milan. Photo: Miguel Medina/AFP

Also continuing throughout the lockdown:

  • Everything necessary to continue to supply electricity, gas, water and fuel
  • Garbage collection and treatment
  • Sewage treatment
  • Public administration (though offices like your local anagrafe may be operating reduced hours and encouraging residents to access services online where possible) 
  • Banking
  • Post and delivery services (though many post offices have reduced their opening hours)
  • Teaching (by distance: schools and universities remain closed)
  • Legal services
  • Insurance services
  • Engineering
  • Architecture
  • Veterinary services
  • Caregiving 
  • Electrical installation and maintenance
  • Plumbing
  • Cleaning and pest control
  • IT and communications services
  • Repairs of computers, routers, phones and other communications equipment, as well as home appliances
  • Call centres
  • Private security
  • Scientific research and development
  • Italy’s aerospace and defence sectors
  • Manufacture of plastic, wood, paper, card and rubber
  • Manufacture of textiles and work clothing (though not regular clothes)
  • Manufacture of coffins

All businesses still open are expected to protect the safety of their staff and customers by taking precautions such as distributing gloves and face masks and ensuring people keep at least a metre’s distance between each other. 

The restrictions are liable to be extended or revised by Italy’s government in the coming weeks.

 Italy

Coronavirus Cases:

63,927

Deaths:

6,077

Recovered:

7,432